NRA Family Favorites: September 17, 2022

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Welcome to NRA Family Favorites, our favorite stories from around the Web, for the week of September 17, 2022!

This year, your NRA National Firearms Museum is marking 87 years in operation, preserving and chronicling nearly seven centuries’ worth of firearms history during that time. With the opening of the new Doc Thurston Gallery to the public at NRA headquarters in Fairfax, Va., this past May, the new gallery includes many Old West artifacts from his collection and adds about 450 firearms to the museum’s total display. In total, the NRA National Firearms Museum boasts 2,600 firearms filling 85 exhibit cases in 15 different galleries—each evocative of the time period of the firearms represented. Our friends at America’s 1st Freedom have more!

Women who carry a firearm do so for different reasons. For some, it’s a well-established habit; others are new and still need ideas on how to best implement the practice into their daily lives. Here are a few ways to make carrying a habit that happens easily. Our friends at NRA Women have some advice on creating good concealed carry habits (and they work for men, too)! 

Also from our friends at NRA Women, a reminder of why we carry concealed: self-defense. If you hope to get out of a violent situation without using your concealed carry firearm, you need to know how to respond to the particular type of predator you are facing—and the way you handle the two types of predators can be very different. It’s important that you’re able recognize the signs of each type so you know what you’re dealing with and how to respond before a situation forces you to go to your gun. Columnist Jo Deering explains

Lever-action, single-shot, bolt-action, semi-automatic and pump. When we picture a .22-caliber rifle in our mind, one of these traditional guns is sure to appear. However, a new style is emerging as a great sporting tool. Lately, .22-caliber rifles are being built on tactical rifle frames. These guns may look a lot different, but when it comes to putting a round in a squirrel’s ear they all work the same. Hunting Squirrels: Which .22 is for You?

Meet the man who created the world’s largest caliber. William Feldstein had never ordered a double gun to his own specifications. All the rifles he bought had been made for other people “back in the day.” As the crown to his impressive collection, he wanted to add a battery of big-bore rifles so, in 1985, he paid a visit to Holland & Holland’s prestigious shop in London … check in hand. He was there to order a set of four Nitro Express (NE) double rifles tailor-made to his personal preferences. He wanted the set to include large, elephant-capable chamberings: a .375 NE; a .500/.465 NE; a .577 NE; and a .600 NE. The London firm was only too happy to write Feldstein’s considerable order, but with one caveat: A .600 NE would not be possible. Instead, he went with a .700

Given no time constraints, it doesn’t matter how long it takes to stabilize the muzzle and send off the round without disturbing muzzle orientation to the target. Adding two factors—a time requirement and target difficulty—introduces a challenge in acquiring adequate stability in the allotted amount of time. The more demanding the time requirement, the greater the skill required of the shooter, creating an alignment dilemma. Expert firearms instructor Steve Tarani untwists the horns of the sight-alignment dilemma here

Being able to reload a shotgun quickly has endless advantages. No one knows that better than champion shooter Keith Garcia. A police officer and competitor with plenty of awards to show for it, he’s a USPSA Grand Master and holds several 3-gun national titles. Garcia has a reputation as one of the fastest shotgun reloaders in competition history, and has even changed his approach over time to stay competitive. Here are eight of his best tips for mastering the art of a safe and speedy shotgun reload

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